Help & Advice

What to do when someone dies

For immediate help or advice please call 01653 229021. Remember, when calling this number, you will speak directly to a member of my family who will help you through everything.

Registering a Death

By law a death has to be registered before the funeral can take place. It is not necessary to register the death before starting to make provisional arrangements; however, funeral arrangements should not be treated as confirmed until the death has been registered.

In most cases a Medical Cause of Death Certificate will have been issued by the doctor who had been treating the deceased immediately before death. This certificate is collected from the Bereavement Officer if death occurred in hospital or from the normal doctor’s surgery if death occurred in a nursing home or private residence.

It is not advisable to attend the Register Office without an appointment, you may have to wait for a long time, or not be seen at all. You will not be given an appointment until you know when the Medical Cause of Death Certificate will be available to you.

Registering a death will usually take about half an hour, and will consist of an interview with a registrar who will ask for the following information: -

  • The date and place of death
  • The full name of the person who has died
  • Their name before they were married, if this was different
  • Their date and place of birth
  • Their job and, if they were a married woman, the full name and job of their husband
  • Their usual address
  • The date of birth of their husband or wife (if they were married)
  • Their National Health Service Medical card, if you have this

After the death has been registered, the Registrar will issue a document which allows the funeral to take place. This should be handed directly to the funeral director. The Registrar will also issue copies of the entry in the register, these are often referred to as the death certificates (there is usually a charge for these) and may be required for bank accounts, insurance claims etc. It is always a good idea to get a few copies of this as there is an extra charge for certificates required at a later date.

Malton Registration Service

Ryedale House, Old Malton Road, Malton YO17 0HH

Tel. 0845 0349483

In a Nursing or Care Home

When a death occurs in a nursing or care home, the deceased’s usual doctor, or an on call doctor, will be called to confirm death. Only after the doctor has attended can the family or home staff call the funeral director to take the deceased into their care. The deceased’s normal doctor will issue the Medical Cause of Death Certificate and this is normally collected from the surgery in order to register the death.

You are welcome to contact us on 01653 229021, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for any advice, to take your loved one into our care, or to start making provisional arrangements.

If the death is unexpected, the death may be reported to the Coroner in which case the police will attend on the Coroner’s behalf and the *Coroner’s nominated funeral director will be called to remove the deceased to hospital to await further investigations. After the Coroner has carried out their investigations, they will release the body to the funeral director and supply the Register Office with the appropriate paperwork for the family to attend and register the death.

*Please note – You are under no obligation to use the Coroner’s funeral director for funeral arrangements. They are only contracted to convey the deceased to hospital, or store the body until it can be taken to the hospital if out of normal working hours.

At Home

When death occurs at a private residence, the first call is to the normal doctor or duty on call doctor. Only after the doctor has confirmed death can the funeral director take the deceased into their care. The deceased’s own doctor will issue the Medical Cause of Death Certificate to the family who can then register the death.

If the death is unexpected, the death may be reported to the Coroner in which case the police will attend on the Coroner’s behalf and the *Coroner’s nominated funeral director will be called to remove the deceased to hospital to await further investigations. After the Coroner has carried out their investigations, they will release the body to the funeral director and supply the Register Office with the appropriate paperwork for the family to attend and register the death.

*Please note – You are under no obligation to use the Coroner’s funeral director for funeral arrangements. They are only contracted to convey the deceased to hospital, or store the body until it can be taken to the hospital if out of normal working hours.

You are welcome to contact us on 01653 229021, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for any advice or to start making provisional arrangements.

In Hospital or Hospice

When a death occurs in hospital or hospice, it is usually expected by the doctors treating the patient. This means that the doctor will be able to issue a Cause of Death Certificate which in turn is used to register the death.

The medical cause of death certificate is usually issued via the bereavement officer at the hospital and can be collected by arrangement with them.

If for any reason the doctor feels they are not in a position to issue the cause of death certificate they will refer the case to the Coroner who will decide whether a certificate can be issued or whether further investigation is necessary. If further investigation is required, a Post Mortem Examination may be ordered, this is usually to determine the exact cause of death. In most cases this will not necessarily cause delay in making funeral arrangements. After the Coroner has carried out their investigations, they will release the body to the funeral director and supply the Register Office with the appropriate paperwork for the family to attend and register the death.

You are welcome to contact us on 01653 229021, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for any advice or to start making provisional arrangements

When Someone Dies Away from Home

We are happy to assist families who are in the unfortunate position of having to arrange a funeral for a loved one who has died away from home.

Bringing a loved one home

It is possible to repatriate your loved one wherever they should pass away, be it in the UK or abroad.

  • If someone dies within the UK, we will arrange any necessary paperwork and personally collect their body from wherever they are.
  • If someone dies overseas, we can make all the arrangements for them to be returned to the UK for their funeral. We can liaise with all the authorities, both here and abroad, to help take as much of the stress away as possible.

Returning home

  • Many people wish to be laid to rest in their native town or country. We can make all the arrangements to facilitate this.
  • We will personally transport a loved one’s remains anywhere in the UK, giving the families the peace of mind that they are being cared for on their whole journey.
  • Along with specialist repatriation partners, it is possible to return people to virtually anywhere in the world. Repatriation is mainly by air, but we can arrange to have the bodies of your loved one’s transported by road to the Republic or Ireland and mainland Europe if that is the family’s wish.

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